News

The 2017 Convention of the South Carolina AFL-CIO was compressed and cut short by the threat of a hurricane evacuation but was still well-attended.  The annual meeting was held in the coastal city

Columbia CLC participation in the 2017 Columbia Christmas Parade came off as a success according to CLC members and SC AFL-CIO Pres.

Working people are tired of hearing how tax giveaways for Wall Street billionaires and corporations will supposedly trickle down to the rest of us.

Groups from various South Carolina union groups got up early on Labor Day morning to participate in two separate parades:  Charleston and Chapin.  

The event in Chapin, north of Columbia near the densely populated Irmo and Lake Murray areas, is part of that town's annual festival and draws thousands of people each year.  The Chapin entry is typically organized by IATSE 347 and this year also included participation from the Greater Columbia Central Labor Council and the SC AFL-CIO.  Participants passed out Labor Day stickers to youngsters and pro-labor postcards to adults.

Growing up on Chicago’s South Side, I learned at an early age the power of unions to dramatically improve the opportunities of black families in America.

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The tension between work and time off has always been a concern of the American labor movement. Work may be one of our core values, but it has a purpose, which is to allow us to live good lives, provide for ourselves and our families and, yes, to earn some time off to enjoy the fruits of our labor. Today, work and time off are badly out of balance, and Labor Day is a case in point.

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Working people are taking fewer vacation days and working more. That's the top finding in a new national survey, conducted by polling firm Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research for the AFL-CIO in collaboration with the Economic Policy Institute and the Labor Project for Working Families. In the survey, the majority of America's working people credit labor unions for many of the benefits they receive.

As Hurricane Harvey and its remnants bring unprecedented flooding and damage to a huge portion of Texas, working people in the state are going above and beyond their duties to help one another.

In January, I was invited to serve on President Donald Trump’s manufacturing council, along with my boss, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka. At the time, I was deputy chief of staff at the AFL-CIO (the largest federation of trade unions in America) and a spokesperson for the organization on trade, manufacturing, and economic policy. President Trumka and I agreed to serve because we believed — and still do — that working people should have a voice in crucial government decisions affecting their jobs, their lives, and their families.

When news first broke that Amazon was buying Whole Foods, it sent shockwaves throughout the retail food market. The stock prices of top grocery stores all declined, and thousands of Whole Foods workers began to worry whether Amazon’s love of automation and preference to use robots instead of people would mean the end of their jobs. Amazon’s pursuit of world domination didn’t stop there.

In a badly needed victory for organized labor, a coalition of workers' rights groups in Missouri is poised to halt a devastating new anti-union law from taking effect later this month.

Read the full article at In These Times.