News

Labor Among Focuses of Progress SC Summit

A few dozen boxes of canned goods were distributed immediately before and after Christmas, free of charge to recipients who needed them, thanks to the Columbia Central Labor Council(CLC).  

Columbia CLC participation in the 2017 Columbia Christmas Parade came off as a success according to CLC President Sandy Squirewell and SC AFL-CIO Pres. Erin McKee, compared to the last few years where a lack of participation hurt the entry.  McKee was among those who walked in this year's event and helped to carry a banner.

Those walking carried a total of 5 banners, bearing everything from the AFL message, to the CLC banner bearing the AFL mantra, "From the People Who Brought You the Weekend" to one stating that "Right to Work = Low Wages."  

(Columbia, October) Healthcare and Labor were among the issues discussed during the Our Revolution Fall Conference.

The conference was attended by approximately 150 people, including people affiliated with the SC AFL-CIO as well as candidates who they have endorsed. 

The event drew people from all over South Carolina but primarily from the Midlands.

SC AFL-CIO President Erin McKee was among the 30+ attendees present for the Fall Conference of the SC Progressive Network.  The event was held over a two-day period at the Santee State Park.  

Also attending, President-emeritus Donna Dewitt and Greater Columbia Central Labor Council Sec.-Treas. William Christopher, as well as several other members of the National Writer's Union.

The annual convention of the South Carolina AFL-CIO will be held September 7th-9th in Georgetown.  
Speakers will include Mark Dudzic with The Labor Campaign for Single Payer who will speak in support of a single-payer health care system.  Go to laborforsinglepayer.org.
Mike Morrill with Progress South in Columbia is another confirmed speaker.  That organization's website is www.progresssouth.net.

Around a dozen protestors carried signs reading "Immigrants Built this Country," "Deport Trump Not Immigrants," etc. during a lunchtime protest May 1st, International Workers' Day.  Some signs were in Spanish with statements like "You Are Not Alone."  The event was held in front of Encore Boats, a Lexington County manufacturer who terminated 21 employees after the workers participated in the Immigrants No-Show Day Feb. 16th.  Those 21 were among only a hundred who were fired nationwide following the event.  

More than a thousand protestors participated in the post-inaugural Women's Day of Action Rally which was combined with the Progressive Network's Stand Up Rally in Columbia(1-21-17).  

The list of speakers included Leonard Riley with the ILA Local 1422 out of Charleston.  The Longshoremen were well-represented at the event.  Some of the union members included representatives of SMART, CWA, IATSE, ARA, NNU and NWU.  

One of the breakout sessions following an organizing summit was focused on labor.

Organized labor managed an increasingly rare feat on Monday — a political victory — when its allies turned back a Senate measure aimed at rolling back labor rights on tribal lands.

The legislation, called the Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act, would have exempted enterprises owned and operated by Native American tribes from federal labor standards, even for employees who were not tribal citizens.

The notion of bringing home 80 cents for every dollar pocketed by a man on a national basis is unsettling enough. But it's even more startling when those lost wages are added up.

Overall, it amounts to $10,000 in lost wages a year, says Debra Ness, president of the National Partnership for Women and Families. That chunk of cash could pay for 14 more months of child care, 74 more weeks of groceries and an additional 10 months of rent for the average woman.