Deceased Columbia Firefighter Honored at CLC Meeting

Color Gaurd Members and Officers of the International Association of Firefighters Local #793, honoring Becky Kitchen Jetzke with their International Flag following the death of her husband James Jetzke.  Presentation was made during the meeting of the Greater Columbia Central Labor Council at SC AFL-CIO offices Tuesday night.  Jetzke died of a sudden medical condition.  The flag was originally presented to officers of the 793 during the International's convention in Las Vegas last summer but Ms. Jetzke was unable to attend.  

Despite its setbacks, or perhaps because of them, organized labor has an energy level that AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka says he hasn’t seen before in his 50 years with the movement.

On May 7, while recovering from an illness, Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) International President Larry Hanley died suddenly.  In a brief statement, his family,

Patt Moon-Updike wanted to be a nurse since she was 9 years old.

LaVerne Washington, executive board member and steward of American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Local 101 in San Jose, California is on her way to retiring credit card debt free. Washington has been an AFSCME member for 18 years. As she started planning for retirement from her job as a paralegal, she researched ways to reduce her bills and high interest credit card debt. She remembered that Union Plus Credit Counseling is one of the benefits available to her through AFSCME Advantage.
In October 2012, Hurricane Sandy, also known as “Superstorm Sandy”, battered the east coast of the United States and caused billions of dollars in damage. “We had never seen anything like it,” says Shileen Shaw, recalling the damage her East Orange, NJ, home suffered at the time. Shaw’s home lost electricity for weeks and her roof endured severe damage. Luckily, she was able to turn to her union for help.

Abigail Disney, granddaughter of the co-founder of the Walt Disney Co., called out the family business’ current CEO last month for making what’s supposed to be the happiest place on earth pretty darn miserable for its workers.

House Democrats have a plan to make unions great again.

They’re trying to get support for a sweeping labor reform bill that would reverse decades of Republican-backed policies meant to crush labor unions.

Re: Ashley Jochim's April 25 Detroit News opinion, "Charter schools, the future of teachers unions": There is no doubt Michigan’s public schools are facing problems and it’s widely known that educators, through organizing with their unions, are speaking out to improve learning conditions, have a say in educational administration, and improve working environments.

Like so many California families, Karim Bayumi of Anaheim, his wife and two young children are doing everything they can to scrape by.

Bayumi drives for a large rideshare company as his primary source of income. On March 11, Bayumi’s rate was cut from 80 cents a mile to 60 cents a mile, just barely above the government mileage reimbursement rate. No warning. No explanation. In an instant, a chunk of his income just disappeared.

Multinational corporations pressing Congress to adopt an updated version of the North America Free Trade Agreement shed over half a million U.S. jobs for trade-related reasons since NAFTA took effect, according to a new analysis of government data.

Early in the morning on Nov. 26, 2018, Dave Green, the president of Local 1112 of the United Auto Workers, which represents workers at a General Motors plant in Lordstown, Ohio, received a call from the plant’s personnel director. Green needed to be at the plant at 9 a.m. for a meeting. The personnel director rarely called Green, and when he did, it was almost always bad news. Green got into his car — a silver Chevy Cruze — and sped toward the hulking 6.2-million-square-foot factory, which had manufactured nearly two million Cruzes since the car was introduced in 2011.