South Carolina AFL-CIO

 

On a rainy December Saturday morning, some members of the Columbia Central Labor Council and their friends walked through the streets of that city as part of an annual Christmas parade and handed o

The 2018 Convention of the South Carolina AFL-CIO was once again held in Georgetown. The event barely missed a hurricane like the one that cut the previous year’s convention short.

Labor Among Focuses of Progress SC Summit

Gebre was still a boy when he was forced to flee Ethiopia, a country that suffered political turmoil and famine during the 1980s.

Recent News

More than a dozen members of International Longshoremen(ILA) Local 1422 including SC AFL-CIO VP Charles Brave, Jr. drove from Charleston to Columbia to help launch the SC Poor People Campaign, part of a national campaign launched in at least 35 states.  The National Writer's Union was also represented by a number of members from the Columbia area.  

Around a dozen protestors carried signs reading "Immigrants Built this Country," "Deport Trump Not Immigrants," etc. during a lunchtime protest May 1st, International Workers' Day.  Some signs were in Spanish with statements like "You Are Not Alone."  The event was held in front of Encore Boats, a Lexington County manufacturer who terminated 21 employees after the workers participated in the Immigrants No-Show Day Feb. 16th.  Those 21 were among only a hundred who were fired nationwide following the event.  

Richard Trumka came to Milwaukee Tuesday to fire up labor activists and tear into Gov. Scott Walker.

The national president of the AFL-CIO used his address at the group's state convention to portray Walker as a "little puppet" of the billionaire Koch brothers.

Walker, the two-term Republican governor whose Act 10 crippled organized labor in 2011, faces Democrat Tony Evers in the fall.

"On November 6 we’re going to have one hell of a party — a Scott Walker retirement party," Trumka said.

Labor has always held electoral power, especially when wielded by women. Former Secretary of Labor Francis Perkins’s lifelong dedication to workers’ rights was sparked by witnessing the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911, in which 146 people — predominantly young Jewish immigrant women — died, most as a result of locked factory doors. Though they shunned the ballot box, legendary political radicals like Lucy Parsons, Emma Goldman, and Elizabeth Gurley Flynn were all labor organizers.

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Thousands of hardworking Marriott workers are on strike because many of its full-time employees aren't able to earn enough to make ends meet. They're taking on one of the world’s most profitable and powerful companies. Stand with them.

Tell Congress to repeal the tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations instead of cutting the vital programs that benefit nearly one-third of the U.S. population.