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All this is fine as far as it goes. But we need to be more ambitious. We should be raising the federal minimum to $15 an hour. Here are seven reasons why: 1. Had the minimum wage of 1968 simply stayed even with inflation, it would be more than $10 an hour today. But the typical worker is also about twice as productive as then. Some of those productivity gains should go to workers at the bottom. 2. $10.10 isn’t enough to lift all workers and their families out of poverty. Most low-wage workers aren’t young teenagers; they’re major breadwinners for their families, and many are women. And they and their families need a higher minimum. Read more >>>

It’s good to be a CEO, at least paywise. According to the 2014 AFL-CIO Executive PayWatch, released today, it’s 331 times better to be a CEO than an average worker. PayWatch finds that the average CEO of an S&P 500 company pocketed $11.7 million in 2013, while the average worker earned $35,293. The gap between CEOs and minimum wage workers is more than twice as wide—774 times. Read more >>>

 Immediately after SC Governor Nikki Haley appeared at an automotive industry conference in Greenville and attacked unions, saying that new companies were not welcome in South Carolina if they plan to bring a union with them, SC AFL-CIO President issued a letter to the editors of news publications around the state. Haley said, “Unions are trying to come to South Carolina...My wearing heels is not a fashion statement...we're kicking them everyday and we'll continue to kick them.” Her comments came days after UAW failed to organize at a Volkswagen plant in Tennessee.

"She is lying when she says there are no unions in South Carolina and she knows she is lying," McKee said.

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Nights of Labor Studies

Daryl Mosely was desperate for a better opportunity to support his family. Frustrated by his retail job’s low wages and disappointed by the small yearly raises, when his father—a union plumber and former apprentice—encouraged him to apply for an apprenticeship program, Mosely was all ears. Read the full article>>>

 

 SC AFL-CIO President Erin McKee participated in a panel discussion held by the Democratic Women's Council, which conducted a day of events at the State House encouraging more women to run for political office. McKee discussed the AFL-CIO's support of candidates, “who support unions and aren't afraid to say so, but also those people who are going to be strong, viable candidates.” She talked about Governor Nikki Haley's attack on unions and how during a conference concerning the automotive industry in Greenville, Haley stated that there were no unions in the state... Read more >>>

The South Carolina AFL-CIO is the state federation of labor representing more than 130 unions throughout the state.

The mission of the South Carolina AFL-CIO is to improve the lives of working families—to bring economic justice to the workplace and social justice to our state and the nation.

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 Vice President Joe Biden promoted needed improvements at the Port of Charleston from its Columbus St. Terminal on the early afternoon of Monday, Sept. 16.

About 40 members of local labor unions, including the International Longshoremen’s Association that serves the port, attended the event by direct invitation from the White House, and made up the largest collective group amongst the 240 attendees.

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A South Carolina labor group said it will air its objections today to a local business seminar about “stifling the use of social media” by unions trying to organize workers. Read more >>>

Several union leaders spoke out against a Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce event at a news conference today in downtown Charleston. Read more >>>

Erin McKee was elected president of the South Carolina AFL-CIO at its 57th annual convention in Georgetown on September 6.

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